I need a foldable infographic.

It’s really great when a client has a clear idea of what they want. If you tell me you need a foldable infographic, that tells me you know what you want. Unfortunately, I just can’t tell exactly what that is. You see, the term “infographic” is a really hot word right now, but the concept has been around forever, and all it means is “a visual way to convey data”. So the request has two vague clues of what you really want: 1- you want the final product to be visual, possibly with plenty of icons & 2- you need it to be a printed piece, since digital things don’t fold (yet).

But that still leaves the designer with the question:  what do you need designed?

For starters, a great many things are standardly folded in the world of print design: folders (pun intended) and brochures are just two of the most common. You can also fold posters, have fold-out graphics for books, invitations, etc. I’m sure you see where I’m getting at. It would be crazy to expect clients to learn design jargon—and I am not a fan of jargon to begin with—and as quirky as designers can be, they are not usually crazy. So, what should you do?

The next time you have a very clear idea of what you need your designer to do, try to provide examples or, better yet, set up a time for you two to talk through your ideas.

Who knows? Maybe the designer will take a look at the information you are trying to convey—or data you have—and have an insight into another possible deliverable that might better fit your goals.

I need a foldable infographic.

It’s really great when a client has a clear idea of what they want. If you tell me you need a foldable infographic, that tells me you know what you want. Unfortunately, I just can’t tell exactly what that is. You see, the term “infographic” is a really hot word right now, but the concept has been around forever, and all it means is “a visual way to convey data”. So the request has two vague clues of what you really want: 1- you want the final product to be visual, possibly with plenty of icons & 2- you need it to be a printed piece, since digital things don’t fold (yet).

But that still leaves the designer with the question:  what do you need designed?

For starters, a great many things are standardly folded in the world of print design: folders (pun intended) and brochures are just two of the most common. You can also fold posters, have fold-out graphics for books, invitations, etc. I’m sure you see where I’m getting at. It would be crazy to expect clients to learn design jargon—and I am not a fan of jargon to begin with—and as quirky as designers can be, they are not usually crazy. So, what should you do?

The next time you have a very clear idea of what you need your designer to do, try to provide examples or, better yet, set up a time for you two to talk through your ideas.

Who knows? Maybe the designer will take a look at the information you are trying to convey—or data you have—and have an insight into another possible deliverable that might better fit your goals.

cica
About the author

Designer and communicator with over a decade of experience working for a broad range of corporate and non-profit clients in Brazil and the United States.

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Hiring a designer can be confusing.

There are times when instructions get lost in translation, files look wonky, and expectations aren’t met (on both sides). But it doesn’t have to be like that. Below is a running list of tips to help you navigate everything from how to share an image with your designer, to what to expect a print-pdf to look like. Hopefully these short explanations will help make things clear, and improve your next experience hiring any creative.

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